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Wednesday, April 13, 2005

 

My Car and Firearms

So,
I bought a car on eBay. I know, now you've got a bridge to sell me. But it's a '95 Crown Vic Interceptor (the police package) with less than 73K miles on it. How the hell could I pass on that?
All I need now is a fedora, some smokes, and cooler shades, and I'll be livin' the Blues Brothers dream.
I sent FASTAC 6 chasing after it while I'm working on my term papers and studying for finals. BTW, if anyone can explain in simple terms why Hubble's Constant isn't constant, I'd love to hear it.
Also, SF ALPHA GEEK www.sfalphageek.blogspot.com, has a running discussion in his comments about firearms.
Here's my summary of terms:
Clip: Hold bullets, can slip into a weapon like the Garand, or used to rapidly load magazines as stripper clips.
Magazine: Boxy container of bullets. Has a clip inside it. Can lock onto a weapon like an AKM, or is fixed into place on the weapon like the SKS. In other words, you feed bullets into the magazine-based clip of an SKS individually or by using a stripper clip.
Lock an' Load: Lock refers to fixing the magazine into place on the weapon. You are NOT loading a clip into the weapon, you are locking a magazine into place. Load refers to actually chambering a round in the weapon, usually by drawing the bolt back and releasing it forward and shoving the top round of the internal clip or magazine-based clip into the chamber. This can vary on the weapon.
Safe: Refers to a weapons safety being selected, preventing the trigger from operating the firing pin mechanism (usually).
Silencer: Does not exist. Suppressors minimize or reduce the sound of a gunshot, but the noise is still audible and distinctive.
Automatic vs. Semi- automatic: Automatic means you pull the trigger once and hold it back and the bolt cycles repeatedly until you release the trigger. Neat shit, but goes through ammunition quickly. Use wisely. Semi-Automatic means that the bolt cycles only once for each trigger pull, meaning every time you fire a round, you must pull the trigger.
Round vs. Bullet: A round refers to the entire projectile system; bullet, propellant, casing, etc. A bullet is the actual projectile going down-range.
Miscellaneous: Many rifles and a few shotguns are bolt-action, meaning that you have to manually cycle the bolt to chamber and eject rounds.
Revolvers: Revolvers store rounds in the revolving cylinder that acts as a multi chamber/clip/ magazine and is the central part of the weapon. Most, if not all, revolvers do not have safeties. Revolver suppressors are pointless due to the way their rotating chamber design functions. Do not believe everything you read in bad detective and spy novels. The spy did not disengage the safety on his revolver and screw on a silencer.
Hope this helps.

Comments:
To be picky, all modern revolvers have internal safeties that block the hammer from hitting or moving the firing pin unless the trigger is pulled. Some revolvers to have extranal safeties. For example, the old S&W Hammerless Safety had a grip safety like the one on the Colt M1911A1, and I've seen an older model of a cheap .22 revolver that had an actual safety switch. (I can't recall the model name, though, so feel free to treat that bit as hearsay) Also, the Nagant Model 1895 Gas Seal revolver could use a suppressor due to a weird design where the cylinder slides forward against the barrel and the cartridge case partially covers the bullet so that it covers the remaining gap between cylinder & barrel as the bullet zings on its way. (This was done to get an extra 100fps of muzzle velocity out of the ammunition of the time. The suppresability was a useful side effect.)
 
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All original content on this blog copyright 2005-2012 by bblatt and FASTAC_6; all rights reserved. Original posts are the opinions of the authors only, and do not represent the policies or opinions of any Federal, State, or other private or corporate entity. Comments on posts are unedited, and do not represent the views of the blog authors; they may be deleted at any time by the blog authors